Are You Challenged or Threatened?

Posted by Andrew Netschay, in Blog, Confrontation, Leadership, Psychology, May 09, 2011

As a Leader, one of your critical skill sets is the ability to make a decision. Many managers fall into the analysis/paralysis trap and wallow in a state of indecision as they continually weigh multiple options until the time to act has passed and they are then forced to make a decision.

If this decision making style sounds familiar, then you know this approach to decision making is characterized by a reactive mind set. I’ve found myself stuck many times, unable to swiftly move past analysis to execution. The one question that always gets me ‘unstuck’ is asking myself “are you challenged or threatened?”

As soon as I realize that I’m presenting a situation to myself as something to be feared, that awareness enables me to switch mental gears and reframe the circumstances as a challenge.

Perceiving events as challenges enables you to act with confidence as opposed to reacting out of fear which rarely drives positive results. Facing challenges makes you a Leader.

How do You decide?

You are a Leader

Posted by Andrew Netschay, in Blog, Leadership, Apr 29, 2011

Because you:

  • Prepare for every meeting and negotiation
  • Plan and train for every year-end, quarter, month, week and day
  • Consistently identify and manage risk
  • Hire people smarter than you are
  • Have patience and compassion
  • Walk your talk
  • Are determined, resilient and persevere
  • …and?

 

Are you a Passionate Leader?

Posted by Andrew Netschay, in Blog, Conditioning, Leadership, Apr 25, 2011

Since the age of 13 I’ve been passionate about martial arts. After immersing myself in full contact mixed martial arts (MMA), I fell in love with the conditioning and discipline of daily training. I ate, breathed and dreamt martial arts.

At age 20, my routine consisted of completing my University course load in the morning, then teaching MMA classes for six to eight hours into the evening. I never imagined that my comfort zone of the boxing ring would expand to include the corporate boardroom.

Today, my typical day consists of at least five to six meetings with my teams, triaging approximately 200+ emails and, if I’ve effectively managed my time, a gruelling workout on the heavy bags at Sugar Ray’s boxing gym in Vancouver.

Although the setting has changed, I still look at every meeting, contract negotiation and presentation as an opportunity and challenge. Preparing for a negotiation requires planning and discipline much like the training a fighter undertakes months before stepping into the ring to defend his title.

I look forward to my workouts and still feel exhilarated after landing a perfectly timed body hook. The passion and discipline I apply to my training fuels my days in the boardroom.

What are your passions? Take the time to identify the activities that truly excite you and figure out their specific attributes that speak to your soul and get you out bed at 5am on a Saturday morning because you want to. Because you can’t wait to get on the field for a practise, or hit that 7am tee time, or take off on the open road on that motorcycle you’ve spent six months restoring.

These passions require commitment and consistent rituals to get you the ‘next level’.  What remarkable rituals do you have the make you a better Leader?

 

Welcome to the Enter the Leader Blog

Posted by Andrew Netschay, in Conditioning, Leadership, Mar 23, 2011

If you’re taking the time to read this post I’ll assume you are currently facing some leadership challenges. I started this blog to help you meet those challenges head on and initiate meaningful conversations focused on exceptional leadership. Status quo is not part of our vernacular as a maintenance mentality equates to stagnation. If you’re even entertaining the thought of ‘business as usual’ this is probably not the blog for you.

Facing and preparing (that’s where the strength and conditioning come in) for new leadership challenges is our focus. Continual growth and fine tuning your skill sets or ‘Sharpening the Saw’ as coined by Stephen Covey in his classic “Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” are the foundation of Enter the Leader and remarkable achievement. The topics I cover here will be geared to helping you confidently answer the question “how will my company be talked about in two, five or ten years from now?”